The Army Lawyer | Issue 3 2021View PDF

null New Book Explores History of Army Lawyers in World War I

New Book Explores History of Army Lawyers in World War I

Judge Advocates in the Great War, 1917–1922 has just been published and is being distributed throughout the Judge Advocate General’s Corps to Active, Reserve, and Army National Guard units. The 275-page hard-cover monograph examines what Army lawyers did in the United States, England, France, Germany, North Russia, and Siberia between early 1917, when Congress declared war on the Central Powers, and late 1922, when the last Army lawyer departed occupied Germany for the United States.

In telling the story of the Judge Advocate General’s Department (as the Corps was then known) on American soil, the book focuses on the Office of the Judge Advocate General in Washington, D.C.; the infamous court-martial arising out of the Houston Riot in 1917; and the resulting controversy over the future of military justice that pitted Judge Advocate General Enoch Crowder against his colleague—Acting Judge Advocate General Samuel Ansell.

As for overseas legal operations, Judge Advocates in the Great War details the experiences of Army lawyers in the American Expeditionary Forces in England, France, North Russia, and Siberia between 1917 and 1920, and in the American Forces Germany during the post-war occupation of some 2,500 square miles of Germany between 1918 and 1922.

Topics addressed both in the United States and overseas include the organization of legal operations, criminal law, administrative law, international law, contract and fiscal law, and legal assistance—and who did what, how they did it, and where they did it.

The work also contains biographical sketches of every single lawyer—more than 425 individuals—who served in the Judge Advocate General’s Department between 1917 and 1922. The book also provides details on legal clerks known to have been on duty with the Department. This feature makes the book unique in both JAG Corps and Army history, in that no other branch has published biographical details on every single officer who served in that branch in World War I.

Additional copies of Judge Advocates in the Great War may be obtained by contacting Mr. Fred Borch, Regimental Historian and Archivist, at TJAGLCS, at frederic.l.borch.civ@army.mil; 434-971-3249

 
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